Pear-Leafhopper

Rose leafhopper (Edwardsiana rosae)

White apple leafhopper (Typhlocyba pomaria)

Pest description and crop damage The most observed leafhopper in pears is the rose leafhopper while the white apple leafhopper, a frequent pest of apples, is not commonly seen in pears. Leafhopper adults are pale in color, 0.12 inch long with the wings held tentlike over the body. Nymphs are light green and may move rapidly if disturbed. Rose leafhopper nymphs have rows of black spots on the back. Adults and nymphs suck juices from leaves, causing stippling and mottling on leaves. Leafhoppers rarely cause enough damage in pears to warrant treatment.

Biology and life history The rose leafhopper overwinters on roses as eggs just beneath the bark. Adults will fly into pear orchards beginning in May and subsequent eggs are laid into leaf tissue. There are two or three generations per year.

Pest monitoring As a minor pest, monitoring is not necessary, although presence of the adults can be confirmed by early morning limb taps.

Management-biological control

Parasitic wasps exert some control over leafhopper populations.

Management-chemical control: HOME USE

Chemical control for leafhoppers is generally not required in home pear orchards.

Dormant-season spray

  • superior-type oil-Some formulations OMRI-listed for organic use.

Growing-season spray

  • acetamiprid
  • azadirachtin (neem oil)-Products containing neem extract may be phytotoxic to some pear cultivars. Some formulations are OMRI-listed for organic use.
  • Beauveria bassiana-Some formulations are OMRI-listed for organic use.
  • bifenthrin-Highly toxic to bees.
  • carbaryl-Highly toxic to bees.
  • esfenvalerate-Highly toxic to bees.
  • gamma-cyhalothrin-Highly toxic to bees.
  • horticultural mineral oil-Some formulations are OMRI-listed for organic use.
  • imidacloprid-Highly toxic to bees. Soil drenches may have residual activity in woody plants lasting for 12 or more months. If short-term management is the goal, consider other approaches.
  • insecticidal soap-Some formulations OMRI-listed for organic use.
  • kaolin-Applied as a spray to leaves, stems, and fruit, it acts as a repellant to some insect pests. Some formulations are OMRI-listed for organic use.
  • lambda-cyhalothrin-Highly toxic to bees.
  • malathion-Highly toxic to bees.
  • permethrin-Highly toxic to bees.
  • pyrethrins (often as a mix with other ingredients) -Highly toxic to bees. Some formulations are OMRI-listed for organic use.
  • spinosad.-Some formulations are OMRI-listed for organic use.
  • zeta-cypermethrin-Highly toxic to bees.

Management-chemical control: COMMERCIAL USE

  • Chemical control for leafhoppers is generally not required in commercial pear orchards.