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Seed Crop, Crucifers (Brassica and Raphanus spp.)-Yellows (Fusarium Wilt) See: Cabbage and Cauliflower (Brassica sp.)- Yellows (Fusarium Wilt) See: Turnip and Rutabaga (Brassica sp.)- Wilt (Fusarium Wilt {Yellows}, Verticillium Wilt) ...
Sweet Gum (Liquidambar spp.)-Cankers and Diebacks Note: There are almost no reported fungi on sweet gums in the PNW. The OSU Plant Clinic has found a few fungi that tend to be opportunistic on injured shoots and branches. Injuries may be due to such event ...
Sycamore (Platanus spp.)-Anthracnose Cause Apiognomonia veneta (asexual: Discula platani), a fungus that overwinters on infected sycamore twigs and dead leaves. Anthracnose is a common disease of the western sycamore, Platanus racemosa; the American plane ...
Sweet Gum (Liquidambar spp.)-Leaf Spots Cause The only fungus reported on sweet gum in the PNW is a leaf spot caused by Cladosporium sp. from Oregon. The OSU Plant Clinic has gotten many leaf spot samples on sweet gum in June which are likely seen earlier ...
Sword Fern (Polystichum munitum)-Diseases See: Sword Fern (Polystichum munitum)- Die-off Cause There are not a lot of problems on sword ferns but leaf spots and root rots are the most frequent. Several fungi have been reported from Oregon and Washington i ...
Raspberry (Rubus spp.)-Spur Blight Cause Xenodidymella applanata (formerly Didymella applanata), a fungus. The disease is found in western Oregon and Washington on red raspberry, ‘Loganberry’, and ‘Youngberry’. The ‘Willamette’ cultivar of red raspberry i ...
Image related to Raspberry (Rubus spp.)-Spur Blight
Aucuba-Leaf Spots Cause Leaf spots of Aucuba have been a common problem sent into the OSU Plant Clinic. A wide variety of fungi have been isolated and many have been considered secondary invaders (such as Pestalotia sp.) to abiotic issues such as sunburn. ...
Hemp (Cannabis sativa)-Curly Top By K. Frost and C. M. Ocamb Cause Beet curly top virus (BCTV), which is spread by beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus). BCTV has an extensive host range infecting many common crops include bean, beet, sugar beet, cucurbit ...
A hemp plant exhibiting symptoms of infection of Beet curly top virus in August.  Note that some shoot portions appear unaffected while others show twisting and curling of leaflets characteristic of this disease.